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Kentucky Scholarships

Kentucky Scholarships - LendEDU

Kentucky Scholarships - LendEDU


LendEDU

Kentucky is widely known for their traditional horse races and fantastic football teams. However, Kentucky students have another reason to love their state. Kentucky offers a number of scholarships for Kentucky residents who are seeking to further their education. Some of these scholarships are aimed solely at students who are residents of Kentucky while other …

Alumni Spotlight – Courtney Crume Turley

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

By:  Paige Hart This August we are proud to highlight Courtney Crume Turley with our Alumni Spotlight. She is celebrating her 16th year with 4-H; … Read more

The post Alumni Spotlight – Courtney Crume Turley appeared first on Kentucky 4-H Foundation.

Kentucky Wesleyan Panther Pianists to present recital at Elizabeth Munday Senior Center

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

Owensboro, Ky. (Sept. 13, 2017) – The Kentucky Wesleyan College Panther Pianists will perform at the Elizabeth Munday Senior Center at 1650 W. Second St. on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 11:30 a.m.  This group of college piano students, along with Professor Diane Earle, will perform classical and popular piano solos and duets and take audience…

more: Kentucky Wesleyan Panther Pianists to present recital at Elizabeth Munday Senior Center

Alfred Abel and Diane Earle to give 10-year recital

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

Owensboro, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2017) – Violinist Alfred Abel and pianist Diane Earle will perform a Duo Recital Sunday, Nov. 12, at 2 p.m. in Tapscott Chapel in the Barnard-Jones Administration Building at Kentucky Wesleyan College.  The pair is celebrating 10 years of performing together.  They will perform music by Bach, Grieg and pieces from…

more: Alfred Abel and Diane Earle to give 10-year recital

Sharing and Profits

by Barbara Fister @ Inside Higher Ed

As I was working with a group of students this week, I showed them Google Scholar. They were in their first semester and few of them knew about it. I noticed a ResearchGate link showing up, but didn’t have a lot of time, so I didn’t go into what it is and what it will be in future. Besides, a student asked if the library had databases they could use, which was a perfect segue into the next part of our workshop (and no, I didn’t pay her to ask that question).

Yet it made me think about how prominent a source that site appears to be. It tempts us to think there’s a shortcut, a way to get free full text the fast internet way rather than having to pay whatever the publisher is asking – usually $30-$40 per article - or find your way to the library's site. For some students more familiar with Google than their libraries, it appears to be the way to get articles. Last spring a student asked me what to do when an article wasn’t full text on ResearchGate. Was there some way to get it?

Deep sigh. But what should we expect? Libraries are local; publisher websites and sharing sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu are more seamlessly part of the web. Students are used to searching Google first, and chances are their teachers don’t start their search at the library’s website, either.

Yet the primacy of sites like ResearchGate seems to be . . . over? Publishers have banded together to push back against article information being scraped by ResearchGate and against PDFs uploaded by authors who gave their copyright to the publisher but are tempted by ResearchGate to pretend they didn't and post copies. Apparently ResearchGate, which had responded only to individual takedown notices, has made gestures that it will do more to prevent authors from violating their publishing agreements (or at least make it less tempting to click through the agreement that authors have routinely clicked, either because they thought they owned the rights to their work or they thought they ought to be able to share it, that pesky red tape notwithstanding). Something like this has happened before, and academics were shocked, shocked to learn copyright violations were going on.

In passing I chatted with a faculty member who wondered what the future would hold. How could her papers get discovered and cited if people couldn't find them easily online? She knew about our institutional repository, bless her heart, but that’s not where other scientists go to find her papers. What does it all mean?

Well . . . publishers have a problem if their authors are feeling thwarted, even though they say their beef is with ResearchGate, not with those who use it. Many publishers have already figured out which way the wind is blowing and have started open access journals and allowed authors to make their published papers open if they pay a hefty ransom. They’re buying up platforms that enable sharing so they can control these new means of production. But still . . . what if you don’t have the money to pay for open access from the Big Guys? What if the best journal for your research is behind a paywall, but you worry your research will be invisible?

You can check to see what a journal’s policies are before you submit. Most journals allow you to post a version of your article with a link to the publisher’s version. (Even publishers have started explaining themselves with a site that lets you look up sharing options by DOI or by publisher.) Of course, you have to be sure to save a draft copy of your manuscript before or after peer review and you may have to wait out an embargo before you can post, but it helps people find your work and is the socially responsible thing to do if you care about the large number of people who need to read research findings but don’t have a well-funded library to pay for it. Libraries often provide a repository where these versions can be put online, or you could upload it yourself to your own site or to any of a number of preprint servers that have a disciplinary focus.

Or you can go gold and find a journal to publish in that is fully open access. Not all of them charge thousands of dollars to publish, and there are usually breaks for people who don’t have grants to pay for publishing costs. Many journals (particularly in disciplines that don’t have lots of grant funding sloshing around) don’t charge anything. I’m partial to models like Open Library of Humanities, which depends on libraries for their funding. For a modest charge, libraries can put their money where their mouth is. There are alternatives, and they aren't all owned by the Big Guys.

(This doesn’t solve the problem of reputational metrics that are so embedded in scholarly publishing. A journal established decades ago that has a high impact factor has an edge over new ventures, and I constantly hear faculty say they feel trapped, especially when they not only need that publishing prestige, they need metrics to show it’s being downloaded and shared across the web.)

We have a problem with the Big Guys. Elsevier is trying to expand their walled garden of publications to enclose everything researchers do, and are even attempting to challenge Wikipedia with encyclopedia-like articles algorithmically drawn from Elsevier publications so that researchers won’t be tempted to leave Elsevierland. (Seriously? You want to challenge Wikipedia to an attention duel using algorithmically-massaged content? We'll see how that goes.) They bought SSRN and bepress to integrate those services into the Elsevier empire. At the moment they and other publishers are at odds with ResearchGate, but one of their large cousins, Springer Nature, is trying to strike some sort of deal, perhaps something that will bring ResearchGate into its orbit. (Nature is part of Macmillan Science which recently merged with Springer. Von Holtzbrinck, which has a majority share of this merged entity, also owns Digital Science, which acquired a minority share of Figshare, a data sharing and storage site which has Springer Nature as a customer.)* It will be interesting to see where this consolidation and investment leads as the giants grapple with the sharing impulse while also trying to enclose as much as possible.

What seems less likely to be an option for authors, though, is sharing your work through for-profit platforms that leave all the copyright worries up to you. As far as the big publishers are concerned, sharing should be prefaced with the word “profit.” And unless non-profits like the Center for Open Science comes up with alternatives, they’ll do what they can to keep your work, whether it’s data or preprints or publications, firmly within their grasp.  

*This post has been corrected to clarify that Figshare is an independent entity; Digital Science, which has no connection to Macmillan other than through its parent company von Holtzbrinck, owns a minority interest in it. Apologies for confusing these business relationships. It's like the "begats" in the Old Testament if they were to undergo revision on a regular basis.

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Thursday, October 12, 2017
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Dow Corning Foundation Donor Advised Fund Grant Presentations

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Dow Corning Foundation Donor Advised Fund Grant Presentations Three local schools have recently benefited from the Dow Corning Foundation Donor Advised Fund of Central Kentucky Community Foundation. Elizabethtown High School was awarded a $4,000 grant for their Network Engineers program, Hodgenville Elementary School was awarded $1,300 for school supplies and Larue County High School received […]

We Love It When You Love It

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

How did the hand pies look?  Did you love the brownies?  How many choux did you eat in one sitting?  Yes, these are the things I think about.  So today, after creating a gorgeous selection of our favorites for a client to send as a new year’s gift, I was given a gift of my

The post We Love It When You Love It appeared first on Kentucky Colonels.

Breaking: NCAA finds no academic fraud by UNC

by Jeremy Bauer-Wolf @ Inside Higher Ed

The National Collegiate Athletic Association will not punish the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill after it created fake courses in which students were given credit despite never attending classes, and no faculty members ever taught them. 

The association announced on Friday it couldn't conclude that the "paper classes" in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies benefited just the athletes and thus they weren't considered a violation of NCAA rules. 

“While student-athletes likely benefited from the so-called ‘paper courses’ offered by North Carolina, the information available in the record did not establish that the courses were solely created, offered and maintained as an orchestrated effort to benefit student-athletes,” said a statement from Greg Sankey, chief hearing officer of the panel charged with investigating the fraud, and commissioner of the Southeastern Conference.

Sankey's statement said the NCAA panel was "troubled by the university's shifting positions about whether academic occurred on its campus."

“However, NCAA policy is clear. The NCAA defers to its member schools to determine whether academic fraud occurred and, ultimately, the panel is bound to making decisions within the rules set by the membership," his statement said. 

NCAA rules on "extra benefits," which is the lens through which the association's investigators approached the UNC case, require evidence that the behavior in question provided advantages to athletes (financial payments, academic help) that were generally not available to other students at the institution.  

A 2014 report commissioned by UNC did find that some non-athletes benefited from the fraud.

That report said that a "woeful lack of oversight" and a culture that confused academic freedom with a lack of accountability helped more than 3,100 students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- many of them athletes -- enroll in the fake courses. The report found that the academic fraud was systematic and far-reaching, lasting for nearly 20 years and consisting of 188 classes in the African and Afro-American studies department. About half of the 3,100 students were athletes, and investigators concluded that some university employees were aware of the fraud and actively steered athletes and other struggling students toward the classes.

Dave Ridpath, president of athletics ethics watchdog the Drake Group, called the NCAA and its ruling "shameful," and said that it demonstrates institutions can get away with academic fraud and game the system. 

Ridpath said when he spoke with athletics directors and former members of the NCAA's Division I Committee on Infractions that they said this was a clear and atrocious example of academic fraud. But ultimately Ridpath said he wasn't surprised.

"I don't think that the NCAA enforcement committee never would have the guts to punish North Carolina," he said.

Because of the severity of scandal, Ridpath said UNC would be eligible for the NCAA's harshest sanction, the "death penalty," which would mean shutting down the institution's athletics for at least one season. Such a punishment hasn't been levied since the 1980s, however, making it unlikely.

The university aggressively fought the NCAA's efforts to assert its authority in this case, spending roughly $18 million on legal and other fees. 

"The university does not minimize the extent of the academic irregularities it experienced, even as it emphasizes that those matters are beyond the NCAA’s purview," UNC's lawyers stated in a letter to the NCAA last year. "These matters concern fundamental institutional, not athletic, integrity, and they are not the proper subject of an NCAA enforcement action."

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We Love It When You Love It

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

How did the hand pies look?  Did you love the brownies?  How many choux did you eat in one sitting?  Yes, these are the things I think about.  So today, after creating a gorgeous selection of our favorites for a client to send as a new year’s gift, I was given a gift of my

The post We Love It When You Love It appeared first on Kentucky Colonels.

Seeing secret willdlands

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

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Scholarships - Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation

Scholarships - Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation


Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation

Gerald F. “Jerry” Healy lived his life with a passion for people – from his infectious, inviting smile and enthusiastic conversation to serving individuals and communities with passionate enthusiasm. Nowhere is this more evident than in Jerry’s consistent involvement with numerous charitable organizations across the commonwealth, particularly the Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation. As a …

Today is the day Kentucky – Ag Tag Season Is Here!

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

Support the Triple Crown of Kentucky Agriculture This March Every March, when farmers across the Commonwealth renew their farm license plate, they have the opportunity to make a … Read more

The post Today is the day Kentucky – Ag Tag Season Is Here! appeared first on Kentucky 4-H Foundation.

Washington County Association for the Mentally Handicapped Legacy Fund established at Central Kentucky Community Foundation

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Washington County Association for the Mentally Handicapped Legacy Fund established at Central Kentucky Community Foundation August 11, 2017 – For over forty-five years, the Washington County Association for the Mentally Handicapped has supported the needs of the intellectually disabled in Washington County, Kentucky. At the heart of each project the Association has supported, is a […]

2017 GCKY Photo Contest – Gardening for Pollinators

by Mary Turner @ The Garden Club of Kentucky

Thank you for your interest in the Photo Contest at the 2017 GCKY State Convention. The Submission Period ended on 30 March and no further entries are being accepted.  The photos will be displayed at the main dining room during the convention (April 11 -13). We are also working on a display here online, so […]

Jefferson County Teachers Association UniServ Director Vacancy Notice

by @ Kentucky Education Association

The Jefferson County Teachers Association (JCTA) is seeking applicants for a full-time UniServ Director serving the local association in Jefferson County and its members.  The office is located in Louisville, Kentucky.  JCTA is a certified unit only. Download job description and qualifications here.

2017 Kentucky 4-H Foundation Scholarship Program

by Melissa Miller @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

Applications are Due May 12, 2017 By:  Melissa G. Miller The Kentucky 4-H Foundation is excited to announce its 2017 Scholarship Program.  Through the support … Read more

The post 2017 Kentucky 4-H Foundation Scholarship Program appeared first on Kentucky 4-H Foundation.

2017 Kentucky 4-H Foundation Scholarship Program - Kentucky 4-H Foundation

2017 Kentucky 4-H Foundation Scholarship Program - Kentucky 4-H Foundation


Kentucky 4-H Foundation

Applications are Due May 12, 2017 By:  Melissa G. Miller The Kentucky 4-H Foundation is excited to announce its 2017 Scholarship Program.  Through the support … Read more

2017 Scholarship Program Recipients

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

The Kentucky 4-H Foundation is excited to announce its 2017 Scholarship Program Recipients.  Through the support of our sponsors, the Foundation provided six college scholarships … Read more

The post 2017 Scholarship Program Recipients appeared first on Kentucky 4-H Foundation.

Scholarships

Scholarships


Kentucky School Plant Management Association

  The Kentucky School Plant Management Association (KSPMA) is offering to Kentucky high school seniors, GED graduates and school district employees desiring to further their skills from Regions 1,...

We Love It When You Love It

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

How did the hand pies look?  Did you love the brownies?  How many choux did you eat in one sitting?  Yes, these are the things I think about.  So today, after creating a gorgeous selection of our favorites for a client to send as a new year’s gift, I was given a gift of my

The post We Love It When You Love It appeared first on Kentucky Colonels.

KCU Scholarships | Kentucky Christian University

KCU Scholarships | Kentucky Christian University


Kentucky Christian University

KCU Academic Scholarships Kentucky Christian University is excited to announce our new scholarship program for Fall 2017-18!  KCU recognizes the challenges

Alice Lloyd Volleyball Battles Top-Ranked Kentucky Christian University

by jhall @ Alice Lloyd College

Pippa Passes, KY:  The Alice Lloyd College Lady Eagles volleyball team hosted the NCCAA’s top ranked team, Kentucky Christian University, on Tuesday. The Knights proved they were deserving of their lofty ranking as they won the match in straight sets: 25-14, 25-21, and 25-13. In the opener, KCU came out quickly to establish themselves as […]

Scholarships Program

Scholarships Program


Women Leading Kentucky

About Women Leading Kentucky Scholarships More than $150,000 has been awarded to women attending Kentucky colleges and universities since 2001, educating tomorrow’s leaders today. Deadline: Monday,…

Kentucky Wesleyan earns two Top 10 rankings from U.S. News & World Report

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

Owensboro, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2017) – U.S. News & World Report released its annual list of college rankings on Tuesday, Sept. 12, and Kentucky Wesleyan College’s appearance on two lists includes a #8 ranking in the South as a Best Regional College, a jump of 5 places over last year’s ranking of #13.  “We are very…

more: Kentucky Wesleyan earns two Top 10 rankings from U.S. News & World Report

Charlie’s Compost

by Mary Turner @ The Garden Club of Kentucky

Charlie’s Compost is a natural fertilizer and soil amendment made on a poultry farm in Kentucky, and it is a Kentucky Proud product. For pre-orders via the GCKY 2017 Convention,  GCKY will receive 25–30% of the purchase price (10-lb bags are $10 each; 40-lb bags are $20 each; and Compost Tea is $13 for 1 […]

Brenda Ramich awarded the Dr. Jim Owen Memorial Scholarship

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Brenda Ramich awarded the Dr. Jim Owen Memorial Scholarship July 28, 2017 – Brenda Ramich recently received the Dr. Jim Owen Memorial Scholarship from Central Kentucky Community Foundation. Ramich is a 2017 graduate of John Hardin High School and is enrolled at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College. She is the daughter of Scott and Petra […]

Nikky Finney, Author & National Book Award Winner

by WLK Staff @ Women Leading Kentucky

Author & 2011 National Book Award Winner for Head Off & Split Nikky Finney, winner of the 2011 National Book Award for poetry, and one of Lexington’s most beloved literary figures came to Lexington in 1990 as a one-year visiting professor at UK. She wrote her second book of poetry, Rice, in a cubbyhole desk at […]

History of the GCKY

by Mary Turner @ The Garden Club of Kentucky

History of the Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc. 2015-2017 Edith Nelson, President  As my term is nearly finished, I think back two years ago when I selected my theme Paving The Pathway To The Future with emphasis on Youth Gardening and Native Pollinator Conservation. Awareness is increasing across the Commonwealth of Kentucky of the importance […]

Money Available for School Athletic Programs in Kentucky from California Casualty

by @ Kentucky Education Association

The race for a 2018 Thomas R. Brown Athletics Grant from California Casualty is now on. Public high schools and middle schools in Kentucky that are in need of financial help for their sports programs are urged to apply at www.calcasathleticsgrant.com. Apply by January 15, 2018.

Book Sale Fundraiser

by Mary Turner @ The Garden Club of Kentucky

Book Sale Fundraiser! Thank you for bringing your used gardening and garden-related books to the 2017 GCKY Convention for our Book Sale Fundraiser.  The amount raised will be posted soon. Hardbacks will be $2, softbacks $1,  and prime books near fair market value.  

Author discusses his new book on why liberal arts majors make great employees

by Scott Jaschik @ Inside Higher Ed

Randall Stross earned his bachelor's degree from a liberal arts college and went on to earn a Ph.D. in Chinese history. His career path, however, does not fit the stereotype offered up regularly by politicians and pundits that those who focus on the liberal arts are destined for careers as baristas. He is a professor of business, teaching courses on business and society and on strategy at San Jose State University. And Stross believes a liberal arts education is the best preparation for college students -- including those who aspire to work in business and other areas seemingly far from the liberal arts.

He makes the case in A Practical Education: Why Liberal Arts Majors Make Great Employees (Stanford University Press). In the book, Stross particularly focuses on the career success of humanities majors. Via email, he answered questions about his book and the state of the liberal arts.

Q: What prompted you to write this book?

A: Once I arrived for the first day of kindergarten, I never left school. I went to Macalester College and received an outstanding education, double majoring in history and in Chinese and Japanese languages and cultures. But I knew I was headed to a Ph.D. program in modern Chinese history at Stanford and I never confronted the Great Unknown After Graduation. The book arises from my recent wish to learn about the experiences of those braver than me, who major in the liberal arts and with nothing more than a bachelor’s degree in hand, head out in the marketplace. For this project, I selected graduates who had overcome a higher degree of difficulty in landing well than would economics majors: I ended up only looking at humanities majors, who had sought professional jobs outside of teaching and that had no visible connection to the content of the major. No English majors who ended up in corporate communications, for example. I sought out those like the religious studies major profiled in the first chapter, who would end up as a professional programmer and today is the chief executive of a cloud software company.

Q: Many admissions leaders at liberal arts colleges report increasing difficulty in making the case for the liberal arts. What is your advice for them?

A: If it seems difficult to make the case now, imagine how difficult it would have been in the depths of the Great Depression, when the unemployment rate was 16 percent and headed for 24 percent and market demand for liberal arts majors had evaporated. The talk in the air was of the need for more vocational education. Yet William Tolley, in his inaugural address as the president of Allegheny College, did not falter. He made the case for a broad liberal education in 1931 whose contemporary relevance should hearten all of us who advocate for liberal education. “Specialists are needed in all vocations, but only as long as their vocations last, and vocations have a tendency now to disappear almost overnight,” he observed. He reasoned that in an ever-changing world the broad knowledge covered at a liberal arts college is “the finest vocational training any school can offer.” The argument is no less powerful today. But to make it seem well grounded, admissions leaders should have at their fingertips stories to share of graduates who left their schools with liberal arts majors and have gone on to interesting professional careers.

Q: Politicians seem to love to bash the liberal arts, asking why various majors are needed. How should educators respond?

A: Many politicians -- perhaps most politicians -- view the labor marketplace in terms defined entirely by “skills”: employers need workers equipped with specific skills; students either arrive with those skills or lack those skills. This is new, historically speaking. In a bygone era, 60 years ago, many large corporations hired college graduates in bulk, paying little heed to their majors, and spent the first years training the new hires themselves. So the defense of the liberal arts today must be delivered using the vocabulary of “skills.” Fortunately, conscientious students in the liberal arts can demonstrate great skill in many things: learning quickly, reading deeply, melding information from diverse sources smoothly, collaborating with others effectively, reasoning logically, writing clearly. I will resist the temptation to point out the apparent absence of these skills among those who are doing the bashing.

Q: What information about career options should liberal arts colleges (or departments with liberal arts majors at institutions with a range of programs) provide?

A: I’ve become convinced that conventional career counseling -- setting out the most traveled paths for a given major -- has not been particularly helpful to students. The well-trod destinations are obvious to students anyhow, and the opportunities that they remain unaware of are best uncovered by the students’ own investigations in the real world. Career centers can best help by redoubling their efforts to enlist alumni to serve as peer counselors: current students listen to recent graduates with the greatest interest. In the book, I call attention to how a number of the students I followed found first jobs via connections that were not found through the career center, or even through roommates or the closest of friends, but from less than closest of friends. (This was nicely anticipated long ago in sociologist Mark Granovetter’s “The Strength of Weak Ties” published in 1973.) One student, a history major, would be most helped in landing a job at Google by a woman for whom she babysat.

Q: Many employers say they care more about skills such as critical thinking, ability to work in a team, ability to write well, etc., more than a major. These factors should boost confidence in liberal arts study. Why hasn’t that been the case?

A: Chief executives tend to advocate for hiring graduates with the analytical and communication skills that a liberal education sharpens, but the managers or teams who make the actual hiring decisions have in recent years sought instead something else, what they like to call the ability of a new hire “to hit the ground running.” This drastically shrinks the pool of prospective candidates. It’s also shortsighted in its failing to acknowledge the usefulness of having more people who, once they have learned what they need to about the particularities of an entry-level position, are going to be able to make more creative, or more clearly explained, contributions on day 180 compared to many of their running-on-day-one peers. I hope that the detailed stories of 10 humanities majors who were able to make outsize contributions in their first professional jobs will serve to nudge more hiring teams at other companies to expand their nets and give liberal arts majors the chance to show how quickly they can learn and what they then will be able to do.

New Books About Higher Education
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Move-In Day 2017

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

Check out the 2017 move-in video! Wesleyan Move-In Day 2017 from Kentucky Wesleyan College on Vimeo.

CKCF Welcomes Carter and Sizemore to the Board of Directors

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

CKCF Welcomes Carter and Sizemore to the Board of Directors September 15, 2017 – Central Kentucky Community Foundation is pleased to announce Chris Carter and Jamie Sizemore as the newest members of its Board of Directors. The CKCF board is comprised of community leaders who volunteer their time and expertise to guide CKCF. The foundation serves […]

New visitors in the woods

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

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Dillon Swank received the Elizabethtown Class of 1966 Scholarship

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Dillon Swank received the Elizabethtown Class of 1966 Scholarship July 28, 2017 – Dillon Swank recently received the Elizabethtown Class of 1966 Scholarship from Central Kentucky Community Foundation. Dillon is a 2017 graduate of Elizabethtown High School and is enrolled at Morehead State University where he will play football. He is the son of Steve Swank […]

The usual is so unusual

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

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Work Ready Kentucky Scholarship Program

by Greg Griffith @ Sullivan University

Recognizing that too few able-bodied Kentuckians are gainfully employed, and too few Kentuckians have the skills needed for jobs that remain open in the commonwealth, Governor Bevin and the Kentucky General Assembly have made available $15.9 million for the Work Ready Kentucky Scholarship Program. This scholarship makes certificate and diploma programs providing training in one […]

What’s So Great About Grants and Scholarships?

by admin @ College. Life. Blog.

Many students don’t think about financially planning for their education before they graduate from high school. Unless they’ve been managing their own money and working, students don’t know how much it costs to live—much less, the cost of a college education. This doesn’t include the cost of owning and operating a car, filling it with […]

2017 Emerald Award Winners Announced at Teen Conference

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

The Kentucky 4-H Foundation along with Kentucky 4-H proudly presented the high honor of Emerald to four outstanding 4-H’ers at the 2017 Teen Conference. This year’s winners … Read more

The post 2017 Emerald Award Winners Announced at Teen Conference appeared first on Kentucky 4-H Foundation.

Abigail Edwards received Owen J. Estes, Sr. Memorial Scholarship

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Abigail Edwards received Owen J. Estes, Sr. Memorial Scholarship July 28, 2017 – Abigail Edwards recently received the Owen J. Estes, Sr. Memorial Scholarship from Central Kentucky Community Foundation. Abigail is a 2017 graduate of Hart County High School and is enrolled at the University of Kentucky. Abigail is the daughter of Jerry Edwards and Cressy […]

2017 GCKY Convention – Evaluation

by Mary Turner @ The Garden Club of Kentucky

Prefer hardcopy? Download and fill out the EVALUATION FORM (MS Word format) or (PDF Format)  You can save it on your computer and email it to convention@gardenclubky.org or print it then mail to the convention Registrar (address is on the form).

School Choice Scholarships

School Choice Scholarships


School Choice Scholarships

Changing Lives Through EducationEducate   Invest   Empower   

We Love It When You Love It

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

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Nick Palmer to discuss London conducting experience

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

Owensboro, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2017) – Nick Palmer will offer a presentation about his London, England, conducting experience on Wednesday, Oct. 25, at noon in the Ralph Center lobby at Kentucky Wesleyan College, where he is Distinguished Conductor in Residence.  He recently returned from conducting the London Philharmonic for upcoming recordings.  He worked with them…

more: Nick Palmer to discuss London conducting experience

We Love It When You Love It

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

How did the hand pies look?  Did you love the brownies?  How many choux did you eat in one sitting?  Yes, these are the things I think about.  So today, after creating a gorgeous selection of our favorites for a client to send as a new year’s gift, I was given a gift of my

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A.J. Smith ’71 Alumni Hall of Fame Class of 2017

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

A.J. Smith’s career in football began shortly after graduation from Kentucky Wesleyan College.  He started as a high school coach and steadily worked his way through the ranks, eventually serving over 30 years in the National Football League.  Most recently, Smith was Senior Executive with the Washington Redskins, which followed 14 seasons with the San…

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GCKY 2017 Convention & Evaluation

by Mary Turner @ The Garden Club of Kentucky

PICTURES WILL BE POSTED SOON Join the Facebook Group to see pictures from the convention! WHEN: 11-13 April 2017 WHERE: Barren River Lake State Resort Park, Lucas KY 42156       270‑646‑2151 Hotel Reservations (rooms held for Convention until March 1)   Convention Rate:  $84.63 / night (includes taxes & fees)   SCHEDULE OF EVENTS AT THE CONVENTION […]

Midway University Announces Record Undergraduate & Graduate Enrollments

by Midway @ Midway University

(Midway, Ky.) – Midway University’s fall enrollment figures are in. The overall headcount is 1,217 across all student populations and...

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We Love It When You Love It

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

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KEA Members Apply for KEA President's Scholarships

by @ Kentucky Education Association

KEA members are eligible to apply for KEA President's Scholarships up to $1000 in one of the following areas: Rank II, Rank I, Classified Continuing Education, or National Board Certification. Application deadline is February 15, 2018.  See more information here.

Scholarships

Scholarships


KY PTA

Scholarships – Deadline February 15 Kentucky PTA awards several scholarships each year to: High school seniors who plan to attend a Kentucky accredited college or university and pursue a degr…

Why We Give: Anna and Jay Ivey ’11

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

HometownOwensboro ResidenceHouston, Texas EducationM.S., Occupational Safety, Eastern Kentucky UniversityB.S., Business Administration, Kentucky Wesleyan CollegeOwensboro Catholic High School Career  Safety, health and environmental professional in the oil and gas exploration and production industry for Hess Corporation FamilyMarried to Anna (from N.D.) for five years Why do you give to Wesleyan? “I was a scholarship recipient and a…

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Kentucky 4-H Foundation Welcomes New Director of Advancement

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

Members of the Board of Directors, Staff, and friends of the Kentucky 4-H Foundation: It is an honor to be chosen to join the Kentucky … Read more

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Alumni Spotlight: Jacqueline Rogers

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

By:  Paige Hart Ms. Jacqueline S. Rogers, formerly a Caldwell County 4-H member, is the September Alumni Spotlight. She had a long extension career and … Read more

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Alumni Spotlight: Sharon Furches

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

A native of Calloway County, Sharon Furches grew up the daughter of a farmer and homemaker. Watching her father farm and work a full-time job … Read more

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Kentucky Scholarships

Kentucky Scholarships


JLV College Counseling

Kentucky Scholarships | JLV College Counseling

Etta May & the Changing American Dream

by WLK Staff @ Women Leading Kentucky

Summer is winding down but Women Leading Kentucky is gearing up for an exciting season of Roundtable Networking Luncheons, this fall. On Tuesday, August 30th the ‘Queen of Southern Sass’, Etta May, will do a benefit comedy performance to help us raise funding for scholarships that are given each year to women attending college in […]

Come adventure with us

by colonels @ Kentucky Colonels

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Kentucky Wesleyan College Orchestra welcomes community members

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

The Kentucky Wesleyan College Orchestra invites community string players to join this growing organization.  The orchestra will rehearse and perform a variety of string orchestra and full orchestra repertory in conjunction with the Kentucky Wesleyan Wind Ensemble in two concerts during the 2017-2018 academic year. The orchestra will rehearse in Tapscott Chapel in the Barnard-Jones…

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Exhibitor Packet

by client @ KY PTA

If you are interested in being an exhibitor at the 2017 KY PTA Convention then please download the exhibitor packet today. Click here to download.

Sullivan University Human Resources Leadership Program Granted Major Distinction

by Greg Griffith @ Sullivan University

LOUISVILLE, KY- Sullivan University’s Human Resource Leadership Program has been granted a major distinction that will provide students with the opportunity to more quickly launch their careers. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the largest human resources professional society in the world, has announced that Sullivan University’s Bachelor of Science and Master of Science […]

Give Back, Feel Good and Live Longer!

by Janet Holloway @ Women Leading Kentucky

I think it 2004 when the Board of Women Leading Kentucky carved out its mission of creating opportunities for women to lead, learn, achieve and give back to the community.  We spent a lot of time discussing whether learning should come before leading, but that was due, mostly, to our affection for order and logic. […]

Midway Athletics Launches New Website

by Midway @ Midway University

Midway, Ky. – Midway University’s Athletics Department launched its redesigned website this week. The site went through a complete design makeover...

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Kentucky Firefighters Association

Kentucky Firefighters Association


Kentucky Firefighters Association

Kentucky Firefighters Association was established in 1919 to support firefighters of Kentucky.

Scholarships & Awards

Scholarships & Awards


Alice Lloyd College

Institutional Grants and Scholarships Appalachian Leaders College Scholarship Alice Lloyd College awards tuition guarantees for residents of 108 central Appalachian counties, regardless of income, …

Midway University Donates to Hurricane Recovery Efforts

by Midway @ Midway University

(Midway, Ky.) – With many in Southeast Texas still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Harvey’s devastation, Midway University partnered...

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Alumni Spotlight: Ryan Bivens

by Ben Carr @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

A seed isn’t just a seed – with the proper care over time it has the potential to grow and bear fruit. This sentiment rings … Read more

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Scholarships

Scholarships


Kentucky MATHCOUNTS

59 = Total number of scholarships awarded by Kentucky MATHCOUNTS to our Mathletes 13 =  Total number of FULL, 4-Year Tuition scholarships given at the chapter level competitions  by the ...

College Grant Information for Students with Disabilities

by henry @ College Grants.org

Many college funding opportunities exist for prospective students who suffer from mental or physical disabilities. In fact, disabled students can apply to multiple scholarships available to those who seek for the necessary financial assistance. Families who have loved ones that suffer from a mental or physical ailment can also receive the appropriate assistance to send […]

Kentucky Scholarships

Kentucky Scholarships


Fastweb

<p>The Commonwealth of Kentucky (i/kɨnˈtʌki/) is a state located in the East Central United States of America. As classified by the United States Census Bureau, Kentucky is a Southern state, mor...

Scholarships to bring medical providers to eastern Kentucky

Scholarships to bring medical providers to eastern Kentucky


WATE 6 On Your Side

A Medicaid managed-care provider will donate $180,000 to fund University of Kentucky scholarships aimed at bringing more doctors and nurses to the state’s eastern region.

Miller Named as Executive Director

by Melissa Miller @ Kentucky 4-H Foundation

By:  Pam Rowsey Larson, Chairperson, Kentucky 4-H Foundation The Kentucky 4-H Foundation is excited to announce Melissa G. Miller as Executive Director, beginning March 1st.  … Read more

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Kentucky Wesleyan graduate to present annual Ellie Magnuson Lecture

by simeonpo @ Kentucky Wesleyan College

Owensboro, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2017) – Dr. Douglas Wilson, an ophthalmologist from Columbus, Ind., will present the annual Ellie Magnuson Lecture in Literature and Science on Wednesday, Oct. 18, at 7:30 p.m. in Rogers Hall at Kentucky Wesleyan College. Dr. Wilson has a passion for writing about the national pastime and will speak on “American…

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Scholarships

Scholarships


Kentucky Wesleyan College

Kentucky Wesleyan College ScholarshipsA Kentucky Wesleyan education continually proves to be a great value for students who want an academically competitive atmosphere at an affordable cost. Rankin…

Grant Overview for Undergraduate Students

by admin @ College. Life. Blog.

For many students, the prospect of paying for their education can be daunting and even terrifying. The price of college tuition has skyrocketed over the years. But, that doesn’t mean that a college education is out of a student’s reach, no matter what their family income. Each year, millions of students receive financial aid that […]

2017 Celebrating Community Philanthropy

by connery @ CKCF

2017 Celebrating Community Philanthropy Philanthropy Gives Life On Thursday, September 21, 2017, community leaders and champions joined with Central Kentucky Community Foundation to celebrate the impact philanthropy plays in our communities. Our fifth Celebrating Community Philanthropy event was a wonderful opportunity for us to pause, come together and focus on the generosity of ideas and resources […]

Midway University Athletics Releases new Mobile App

by Midway @ Midway University

(Midway, Ky.) – The Midway University Athletics Department has released a new mobile app that allows fans to keep up...

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Noppadon Onnoy received the Gourmands International Culinary Scholarship

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Noppadon Onnoy received the Gourmands International Culinary Scholarship July 28, 2017 – Noppadon Onnoy recently received the Gourmands International Culinary Scholarship from Central Kentucky Community Foundation. He is a student at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College and the son of Fon Onnoy and Long Chulai. The Gourmands International Culinary Scholarship is $1,000 one-time award and […]

Alice Lloyd College Hosts Ms. Jean R. Hale

by jhall @ Alice Lloyd College

On Tuesday, October 3rd, Alice Lloyd College was privileged to host Ms. Jean R. Hale of Pikeville, KY. Ms. Hale is chairman, president, and CEO of Community Trust Bancorp, Inc.  She has served Community Trust for almost 50 years and has participated in the growth of the corporation from $18 million in assets to over $4 billion in assets.

Research says college students no more narcissistic than previous generations at that age

by Nick Roll @ Inside Higher Ed

The way kids these days dance is, quite frankly, indecent and without any modesty. It’s a reflection of the times, and how the world and its governing morals are degrading.

The above is not about the year 2017, but rather is paraphrased from The London Times’s description of the introduction -- and growing popularity of -- the waltz, more than 200 years ago.

“We remarked with pain that the indecent foreign dance called the ‘waltz’ was introduced (we believe for the first time at the English Court on Friday last),” the Times wrote in its warning about the new, crass dance which involved “the voluptuous intertwining of the limbs and close compressure of the bodies.”

“This is a circumstance which ought not to be passed over in silence. National morals depend on national habits,” the paper wrote, according to an excerpt from 1816 reprinted in the 2009 book The Wicked Waltz and Other Scandalous Dances.

Older generations have been complaining about younger generations for all of human history, argues Brent Roberts, a psychology professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In a new study, co-authored by Roberts, his research pushes back against the assertion that there is a wave or epidemic of narcissism among younger generations, particularly college students.

Young people do tend to be more narcissistic than their older peers, the paper found. But according to the study, titled “The Narcissism Epidemic Is Dead; Long Live the Narcissism Epidemic,” to be published in the journal Psychological Science, people grow out of those higher levels of narcissism. Higher levels of narcissism are not so much generational as they are related to static age groups, no matter which generation is currently in them.

Current college students, who on average score a few points higher on the Narcissism Personality Inventory, Roberts said, will likely eventually grow up to become the older, less narcissistic generation, and perhaps themselves scowl at future youngsters.

Growing up in the 1970s, Roberts remembers being a member of what was called the “Me” generation by cultural critics at the time.

“We didn’t have any values and mores like the great generation which came before us and fought the world wars. We were running around during the ’60s and ’70s being indulgent,” he said, describing the commentary at the time. Then, in the 2000s, there was another narcissism epidemic, according to some researchers, and the generation coming of age was full of unusually narcissistic individuals as well.

But rather than generation upon generation of narcissists, Roberts said it’s just a facet of youth. In fact, according to his study, narcissism among current college students has slightly decreased since the 1990s, when controlling for different interpretations of questions on the Narcissism Personality Inventory.

The NPI pairs two statements next to each other -- such as "I insist upon getting the respect that is due me" and "I usually get the respect that I deserve" -- and asks the user to pick which one applies best.

Roberts and the co-authors used data collected in 1992 and 1996, combining for a total of just over 1,150 students from the University of California, Berkeley, for the cohort of students from the 1990s. For the 2000s, the researchers used data from about 33,650 students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of California, Davis. For the cohort of students in college between 2010 and 2015, data from 25,412 students at those same two institutions were used.

The average NPI scores of all three cohorts were relatively similar -- scoring about 15 or 16 points on a scale that goes up to 40. Grandparents, on the other hand, score around 12.

“By average, you’re going to be more narcissistic than most people who are older than you,” Roberts said of traditional college-age students. “But your generation is no more narcissistic than prior generations at the same age.”

Additionally, the study found, when controlling for potential changes in interpretations of the NPI questions over the years, there has actually been a slight decrease in narcissism among college students since the 1990s.

W. Keith Campbell, a psychology professor at the University of Georgia and co-author of the 2010 book The Narcissism Epidemic, said that Roberts’s research was interesting, although it wasn’t an exact replica of his and Jean Twenge’s research. Twenge is a psychology professor at the University of San Diego and co-author of The Narcissism Epidemic.

“The term ‘narcissism epidemic’ is from a book Jean and I wrote that spent about five pages on increases in trait narcissism and the rest on cultural changes (changes in word use in books and song lyrics, changes in naming practices toward more individualism, increasing rates of cosmetic surgery, larger home sizes, etc.),” Campbell said via email. “This research is irrelevant to these cultural changes, most of which are simple to replicate with open data.”

The answer to why older generations have repeatedly judged younger generations negatively, of course, is another question altogether.

While there are generational differences in how people think and act, Roberts said, older people can often conflate those actual differences with differences that are simply factors of youth, such as, he would argue, narcissism. And while some displays associated with the narcissism and shallowness of youth are particularly visible these days, such as smartphones and social media, for example, Roberts points out that they are often used the same way that rotary phones or mail were used: to communicate with friends.

“We’re using these tools the same way we use old tools,” he said. “To check in with our friends. The fact that we check in with our friends more often, does that make us more narcissistic?”

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Retired Midway Staff Member Earns Emeritus Status

by Midway @ Midway University

(Midway, Ky.) – At its commencement ceremony in May, Midway University President Dr. John Marsden announced that the Board of...

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The Best Scholarships in Kentucky - College Rank

The Best Scholarships in Kentucky - College Rank


College Rank

​Although new degree holders are experiencing a frustrating progression toward their dream careers, college applications from undeterred high seniors pour into admissions offices. The State of Kentucky graduates 83.5% of its high school graduates, according to the <a href="https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/21">US Census Bureau</a>, but like many other states, the effort to transition those students into degree programs …

The concept of reliability in higher education (essay)

by Jeff Rice @ Inside Higher Ed

I don’t think a day goes by that I don’t hear Queen’s “We Are the Champions” on the car radio. Sometimes I flip from one station to the next, and “We Are the Champions” is on both stations at the same time. I doubt that “We Are the Champions” is played on the radio so often because it is one of the greatest songs of all time; it’s not.

“We Are the Champions,” classic rock stations seem to believe, is a reliable option for airplay. That is, if there is any Queen song a radio station should take a risk on playing, “We Are the Champions” is the one most likely to find a sympathetic audience. Reliability, classic rock stations also seem to believe, is the most compelling reason to tune in when drivers are stuck in their cars or when listeners are playing background music at work. “Don’t surprise me with a Queen song I’ve never heard of,” a given radio audience must believe. “Play ‘We Are the Champions’ yet again.”

In the university, reliability is a keyword as well. We produce reliable discourse by repeating -- over our own metaphoric two stations at once -- the same messages daily. We have our own versions of “We Are the Champions,” and we typically call them “policy,” “email correspondence,” “strategic planning” and “administration.” We might hate to hear our version of “We Are the Champions” over and over again, but we are still compelled to listen when it’s played, and in some cases, we are even sympathetic to the repetition. That reliable repetition includes the promotion of “cutting-edge research” and “innovative teaching.” It also includes the support of “critical thinking” and “lifelong learning.” We are “transformative.” We prepare students to be “citizens.” We are the champions, indeed.

I am sick of hearing “We Are the Champions” on the radio when I’m driving around town. Yet what’s wrong with being exposed to what is reliable? Reliability suggests boredom (“Oh, that again?”), but is also suggests dependability or expectation. To teach critical thinking is a reliable gesture (and a sympathetic one).

As department chair, I often feel the pressure of being reliable. I am in my office every day, so people who never stop by can still find me if they one day feel the desire. I schedule meetings at regular intervals. I write letters of support for various initiatives, grant applications, sabbaticals or special requests in a timely fashion. Emails are responded to quickly. I often ask colleagues “How is it going?” and “How’s your semester?” in order to project the image of reliable concern.

The average person would, no doubt, describe this type of work attitude as “reliable” as it attempts to establish comfort and an overall feeling that everything is going according to plan. No worries. It’s all going to be OK. Everyone is all right. At the same time, I don’t want to be my department’s version of “We Are the Champions.”

What is the difference between being reliable and repetitive? If we feel comfortable with having our research called “transformative” by an administrative strategic plan, are we not also admitting to the comfort of meaningless repetition? Still, our academic lives must be regulated by reliability. The semester begins on a specified date and ends on a specified date. Classes begin and end as listed in the course bulletin. Every year, departments collect materials for merit evaluations on the same date as the year before and turn in tenure materials on the same date as the year before. Such acts demonstrate reliability. Such acts give direction and meaning to the academic life. Such acts respond to audience -- the faculty members’ and the students’ -- expectations.

Our discourse, however, walks the tightrope between being reliable (we know what to expect) and simply being repetitive (we’ve heard this before). Administrative email communication to the faculty reminds us monthly that we are “exceptional,” that we provide “leadership,” that we “must work together,” that “we look forward” to something or other, and that despite all of our supposed success, “we must work harder.”

Every administrative presentation to the college’s leadership features a PowerPoint presentation, a printout of that PowerPoint presentation and a follow-up email with an attached file of that PowerPoint presentation. What could be more reliable than three versions of the same presentation? Everyone now can rest comfortably knowing that three times I have heard the same update about the university’s formation of a panel that will investigate how to “envision” an “intellectual vision,” and be “better before we are bigger.”

The standard cliché is that nothing is more reliable than death and taxes. Reliability, indeed, is often situated in terms of clichés: Old Iron Horse. Like a rock. Lean on me. Clichés, too, are simultaneously meaningless and meaningful because of their cultural repetition.

When a novice and inexperienced worker writes a CV, they often include the meaningless phrase “I’m hardworking and reliable.” A young writer might turn to the reliable (and meaningless) introductory phrase to begin an assignment for a first-year writing course (“Since the beginning of time”) and conclude with an even more meaningless yet reliable sign-off (“For all the reasons I stated above …”).

We used to joke that it was reliable to expect someone’s grandmother to die in a freshman writing class. The death announcement after excessive absences was something an instructor could depend on occurring. These are meaningless acts. But they are meaningful in that we find a common knowledge in their repetition.

As much as I hate hearing “We Are the Champions” every day on the radio, I also find the lyrics disturbing, and thus, the song’s reliable appearance during drive time is interrupted by its overall message of despair. Freddie Mercury may be describing a state of eventual success, but everything he says up to that point of becoming a champion is depressing: “Bad mistakes, I’ve made a few/ It’s been no bed of roses/ No pleasure cruise/ I’ve had my share of sand kicked in my face.” When a given audience requests reliability -- whether in administrative presentations, semester scheduling or the department chair’s behavior -- what they are really saying is “Don’t show me the shit that happened prior to the moment repeating itself in a familiar and comfortable way. It’s been no bed of roses. That’s why we want everyone to believe we are transformative. Don’t look at how messed up we often are.”

Thus, the reliable moment may not be positive or even comforting but rather a confirmation of frustration. For every administrative call for action (new program initiative, new courses addressing X, entrepreneurship, diversity in our faculty) we can reliably expect a colleague-led committee to throw up an obstacle, another administrator within the university hierarchy to withhold funds, a department colleague to cast doubt on the project’s potential based on their gut feeling, the administrator who asked for the initiative to have since forgotten about it, or a lack of university capital investment to get the called-for project off the ground. Mistakes, we’ve made a few.

We are the champions. And yet, we’re not. We’re merely audiences positioned in front of repeated messages that appeal to some type of insecurity we possess. Repetition is among the most comforting acts we can engage with, but in the end, repetition becomes frustrating, tiresome and annoying. I don’t want to hear “We Are the Champions” ever again when I am driving through Lexington. I also don’t want to hear about “lifelong learning” or “student success” or “our exceptional faculty,” either. I have to change the channel at some point and hear something else. The only problem is that when I eventually reach for the metaphoric radio knob and switch stations, I hear the Eagles’ “Hotel California.” This song, unfortunately, also is reliable.

Jeff Rice is chair and Martha B. Reynolds Professor of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky.

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Audrey Tayse Haynes, Secretary, Cabinet for Health & Family Services

by WLK Staff @ Women Leading Kentucky

Audrey Tayse Haynes was appointed Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) by Governor Steve Beshear on April 16, 2012. Since being named Secretary of the Cabinet, Haynes has successfully overseen the transition from a fee-for-service delivery model to managed care for the majority of Kentucky’s Medicaid population, saving taxpayer dollars, while […]

ALC Volleyball Earns Weekend Split

by jhall @ Alice Lloyd College

Mt. Hope WV/ Grayson, KY: The Alice Lloyd Lady Eagles volleyball team journeyed to Mt. Hope, West Virginia over the weekend to play one doubleheader against NCCAA II opponents Crown College and host Appalachia Bible College, and then headed to Grayson, Kentucky to play the top ranked team in NCCAA II, Kentucky Christian University and […]

The impact of New York's free tuition program on two community colleges

by Ashley A. Smith @ Inside Higher Ed

Tens of thousands of people have applied for or expressed interest in New York's free public college tuition program since it was announced earlier this year. And now that the academic year has started and those who qualified for the Excelsior Scholarship have begun classes, some colleges and universities are beginning to see the early effects of the program.

But those impacts may depend on how much one requirement of the program -- attending full-time -- plays out at different institutions. Even though part-time enrollments predominate at many two-year institutions across the country, the opposite is true in New York State. In the City University of New York system, more than 58,000 students attended full-time last year compared to more than 26,000 part-time degree-seeking students. At the State University of New York’s 64 campuses, 54 percent of students attended full-time last year compared to 46 percent of students who attended part-time.

"Excelsior is a very new program and its impact is emerging," said Gail Mellow, president of LaGuardia Community College, part of CUNY, via email. The scholarship covers families with annual incomes of up to $100,000 this year, but by 2019 it will cover students from families with incomes of up to $125,000 per year. At the state's community colleges, the income cap is not expected to be much of a factor.

LaGuardia had 494 students qualify to receive the last-dollar scholarship, of which 229 students will actually receive the award. Last dollar means students receive Excelsior after all other federal and state aid has been used. In total, nearly 2,500 students at CUNY's seven community colleges applied for the scholarship, with 1,081 students likely to receive the award.

Although the college cautions that it's too early to make direct correlations, there are some early signs pointing to a possible Excelsior effect on enrollment. Full-time enrollment at the college has increased by 5.2 percent compared to this time last year -- going from 12,641 to 13,298. At LaGuardia, 54 percent of degree-seeking students attend full-time.

New York's focus on offering free tuition to full-time students only highlights a national trend to encourage and incentivize students to pursue more than 12 credits a semester, because research has indicated that full-time status is a great indicator of graduation.

"We have seen an uptick in student interest in LaGuardia and more and more students asking about Excelsior at high school fairs and college tours," Mellow said. "It is helping to create a college-going culture."

Mellow said the program will need to be refined to fully address the needs of low-income students who can't attend full-time because they have to work or attend to other responsibilities.

But that impact on enrollments isn't visible everywhere.

"We're noticing the Excelsior Scholarship program is more beneficial for students going to four-year institutions," said Manuel Romero, executive director of public affairs for the Borough of Manhattan Community College, part of CUNY. "We are continuing to promote and support Excelsior, so, of those students who self-reported [as] Excelsior eligible, we want to provide them with the information they need."

At BMCC, 772 students received the scholarship, but 68 percent of the college's students already attended full-time last year, compared to 32 percent who attended part-time.

Meanwhile, just north of Binghamton is the State University of New York's Broome Community College. That institution saw nearly 400 students qualify for the scholarship, but after other financial aid was distributed, only 185 students were awarded Excelsior. The college has more than 6,000 students. 

"We haven't seen a big change yet," said Broome President Kevin Drumm.

The college averages about 60 percent full-time enrollment and 40 percent part-time, he said, adding that Broome, along with other upstate community colleges, has seen slight increases in part-time enrollments among non-degree-seeking students, but they attribute that that to the good economy.

Drumm said the larger question will be the cultural effects the scholarship will have on long-term demographics. Because despite community college being tuition-free for a long time for many low-income students, now whole families, neighborhoods and communities have gotten the "free message."

The state's legislators didn't approve the program until April, which for many students was in the middle or toward the end of their college search and application process, so many had already made decisions about whether they were going to college, Drumm said.

"Next year at this time will be much more telling, because students now have a whole year to think about it," he said. "This year the guidance offices are up to speed and families will have an entire college application season."

Community Colleges
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Kennedy tabbed RSC Athletic Director of the Year

by Midway @ Midway University

Florence, Ky. – Midway University Athletic Director, Rusty Kennedy, has been selected as the 2016-17 River States Conference Athletic Director of...

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Heels Together Announces Grant Finalists

by sarah0411 @ CKCF

Heels Together Announces Grant Finalists September 7, 2017 – Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana, Elizabethtown Independent Schools and Silverleaf Sexual Trauma Recovery Services are the three finalists for the annual Heels Together funding. Heels Together is a women-led strategic initiative of Central Kentucky Community Foundation. The program strives to enhance the lives of women and […]

What is Help Wanted Kentucky?

by Greg Griffith @ Sullivan University

Proposed Bylaws Amedments

by client @ KY PTA

Click here to see the proposed amendments, approved by the Board of Directors in May 2017 for our member’s consideration at the Kentucky PTA Convention on July 14 and 15, 2017.

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